Coming Soon: Eddie Jones - Creating Team Culture Posted almost 4 years ago

Japan national coach, Eddie Jones, delivers this latest course on creating team culture and environment.

“We’re going to talk about team culture and how you’re going to create an environment so that players can keep improving, and your team can keep improving.”

In the full video course Eddie covers understanding the values that are important to a team, development plans, feedbacks and daily plans for individuals, the selection process and talent v’s character.

The full video course will be available to all subscribers next week.

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Eddie Jones has had an extensive coaching career holding roles with teams including the Brumbies, Reds, Saracens, Australia, South Africa and most recently Japan before becoming England's Head Coach. Following on from successfully leading the ACT Brumbies to their first Super 12 title in 2001 Jones took charge of the Wallabies for the 2003 World Cup on home soil, and fell at the final hurdle as his side were defeated in extra time of the final by Clive Woodward's England. He continued on as coach until 2005, when his contract was terminated following a wretched run of results. From here Jones had a stint in an advisory capacity with English side Saracens and in 2007 was then appointed Queensland Reds coach. He then turned his back on coaching Australia again when he signed in an advisory role with South Africa working closely with head coach Jake White, securing the 2007 World Cup. After the World Cup Jones took up a full time position back at Saracens as director of rugby but left in 2009 for a role with Japanese side Suntory. Jones was head coach of the Japanese national side, before being appointed head coach of England, where he now resides.

Topic Leadership & Management
Applicable to Coaches  

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